Inside the Government Shutdown

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Inside the Government Shutdown

REUTERS

REUTERS

REUTERS

Caitlyn Vaughters, Reporter

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Government shutdowns happen more often than people realize and will continue to happen as long as our government is intact. Since 1995, there have been five partial government shutdowns. Two of those four were when President Bill Clinton was in office, the first began on November 13, 1995 and lasted a total of five days. The second in Clinton’s presidency began December 5, 1995 and lasted a total of 21 days making it the longest in history at that time. The third happened while President Barrack Obama was in office, starting October 1, 2013 and totaling 16 days. The last two have happened more recently with President Donald Trump in office, the first only lasting one day, the second began December 22, 2018 and totaled 35 days, making it the longest shutdown the U.S. has ever seen.

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Past Shutdown Facts

 

 

With the end of the shutdown nowhere in sight, people began to question why it even began in the first place. The obvious answer would be the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. Trump demands he gets 5 billion dollars to build the wall, claiming it is a necessity for our country’s security. When Congress offered $1.6 billion Trump wasted no time rejecting it. Leaving them back where they started.

The real question is: Why did he wait until now to ask for the funding? Why didn’t he request the funding during the two years the house was Republican majority? Is it possible that if he would have asked a few months sooner that he would have received the funding he wants? No questions people have were answered, and most likely never will.

With many workers missing their first and second paychecks, the shutdown began to effect many people. A solution still was no where in sight. Congress continued to refuse the funding, and Trump continued to push to get it. People began to talk about ways the 5 billion could be used better. The 5 billion Trump is asking for could fix the Flint water crisis five times over. Or it could pay for the adoptions of up to 1.25 million kids. It could even relieve all world hunger for a year and plant a tree for every 324,420,000 people living in the US. There are way more serious problems in the US that 5 billion could pay for.

With no compromise in sight congress began to draw up a bill ending the shutdown until February 15, 2019 while lawmakers try to come up with a solution. Trump threatens to declare a national emergency if he does not get the funding by mid- February.

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