Save the Amazon Forest

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Save the Amazon Forest

Talina Hazelton, Reporter

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The Amazon before the fires.

The Amazon Forest is the largest tropical forest in the world with relentless rain. It covers most of north western Brail. It has been around for 55 million years. The Amazon produces 20% of the Earth’s atmosphere and is known to be the planets lungs. (Forbes). Human inhabitants first settled in the Amazon region at least 32,000 – 39,000 years ago. (Panda).

Smoke shown on the Satellites

 

Rondonia, Amazonas, Para, and Mato Grosso have been burning for weeks. Thousands of trees, animal life, and humans will suffer from this. Wild fires are common due to dry season but the Amazon is constantly wet because of the relentless rain they have. Scientist worry that since the fires are raging at a record rate in The Amazon rainforest it is going to be impossible to fight against climate change. The smoke has covered nearly half of Brazil and is starting to go into Peru, Paraguay, and Bolivia. Smoke is visible through the satellites. The Amazon has experienced more than 80% more fires in 2019 than last year. (Mother Jones). Brazil has seen more that 74,000 wild fires this year and 41,000 in the Amazon. (Think Progress).

Smoke coming from The Amazon

There are many articles about the Amazon being on fire. Civilians houses and belongings were burning in the fires. President Emmanuel Macron of France announced that the G7 agreed to get immediate aid packages to help fight the blazes. These cost $20 million dollars to assist Brazil and its neighbors by buying fire fighting planes. Some leaders weren’t happy with the choice of getting the G7 planes. President Trump skipped out on the talks about climate change. (Grist). The Amazon burning was a major tragedy for everyone in Brazil.

 

 

 

 

 

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